A Guide to Buying a Laptop

Computer

Laptops are some of the greatest inventions in modern computing. They give you all the power of a computer without tying you down with weight and bulkiness. However, there are so many choices today that shopping for a laptop can be a daunting task. Below is a guide to assist you to make the best decision. 1. Determine your laptop needs Your laptop buying decision should be based on your needs. For example, a business executive who is always on travel requires a light and a portable laptop. However, that factor matters less to a video editor who requires a laptop for working on his desk. For the editor, things like the processor speed matter more for his work. Likewise, a gaming laptop is fundamentally different from a more casual one. Therefore your choice of laptop should be shaped by your specific needs. Before you go shopping you must evaluate these needs. This will help you narrow down to more relevant choices. 2. Set a budget Like every other buy, it is important to have a set budget when it comes to purchasing a laptop. This will help prevent “buyer dissonance” that people sometimes experience. Buyer dissonance is a feeling of regret or feeling cheated especially if you paid a premium price for a product. A budget will give you a peace of mind because you will only spend what you have planned and can afford. Laptops range from less than $ 500 to over $1500. Having a budget will also help you narrow down on your search. 3. Determine your operating system of choice The operating system determines some things as:a) The user interfaceb) The type of programs you can runc) Compatibility with other devicesd) The security of your system The 3 common operating systems are Windows, Linux, and OSX for Mac. These OS are different and each has its advantages and drawbacks. It is, therefore, important to do your research and know what will work best for you. 3. Specs are everything This is probably what matters most in a laptop. Specs determine how fast or slow your computer is and what tasks it can do and what it can’t do. Usually, you will find that the higher the price, the better the specs you will get. However, this is not always the fact hence you should carefully determine what you are buying. Some of the most important specs to consider include the speed of the processor, the RAM, and the storage space. a) The speed of the processor. The speed of the processor is determined by how powerful it is. The more powerful a processor the faster the speed of your computer will be. Some systems will combine several processors to provide even better performance. Common processors include Intel and AMD. With Intel you will find that core i3, i5, i7 are way faster than Atom, Pentium or Celeron. With AMD you will prefer A6 or A8 over the C or E series. b) The RAM This is an acronym for random access memory. It is the memory that is required to launch and run a computer program. The more RAM your machine has, the smoother it will run and the more its ability to multitask. However, RAM can be upgraded. c) The storage space The disk space determines how much data you can store on your laptop. The main options here are the hard drive and solid state drives (SSD). SSDs offer better performance and are lighter than hard disks. However, they are more expensive. If you store a lot of files e.g. videos or photos, buy something with a large storage. If you are a casual user, 500 GB should be sufficient. 4. Check the connectivity options with other devices Buy something with as many options here as possible. USB ports are standard and you should have at least two. HDMI port allows connection with a big screen TV. VGA port allows connection with projectors or another monitor while Bluetooth allows connectivity with other Bluetooth-enabled devices including smart phones, printers etc 5. Internet connectivityIn this age, you must be able to access the internet with your laptop. Choose something that has built in WIFI connectivity and if possible, a 4G LTE enabled machine is even better.
Newsworthy
Here’s an article about the coming age of computers and artificial intelligence.

A COMPUTER TO

RIVAL THE BRAIN

Artificial intelligence has achieved much of its recent success by mimicking biology. Now it must go further. Artificial intelligence has achieved much of its recent success by mimicking biology. Now it must go further. More than two hundred years ago, a French weaver named Joseph Jacquard invented a mechanism that greatly simplified textile production. His design replaced the lowly draw boy—the young apprentice who meticulously chose which threads to feed into the loom to create a particular pattern—with a series of paper punch cards, which had holes dictating the lay of each stitch. The device was so successful that it was repurposed in the first interfaces between humans and computers; for much of the twentieth century, programmers laid out their code like weavers, using a lattice of punched holes. The cards themselves were fussy and fragile. Ethereal information was at the mercy of its paper substrate, coded in a language only experts could understand. But successive computer interfaces became more natural, more flexible. Immutable program instructions were softened to “If x, then y. When a, try b.” Now, long after Jacquard’s invention, we simply ask Amazon’s Echo to start a pot of coffee, or Apple’s Siri to find the closest car wash. In order to make our interactions with machines more natural, we’ve learned to model them after ourselves. Read more here. It’s amazing to think, that a computer can now think like a human.
Welcome To Neil’s Blog
Copyright 2009, Neils Blog LLC

A Guide to Buying a Laptop

Computer

Laptops are some of the greatest inventions in modern computing. They give you all the power of a computer without tying you down with weight and bulkiness. However, there are so many choices today that shopping for a laptop can be a daunting task. Below is a guide to assist you to make the best decision. 1. Determine your laptop needs Your laptop buying decision should be based on your needs. For example, a business executive who is always on travel requires a light and a portable laptop. However, that factor matters less to a video editor who requires a laptop for working on his desk. For the editor, things like the processor speed matter more for his work. Likewise, a gaming laptop is fundamentally different from a more casual one. Therefore your choice of laptop should be shaped by your specific needs. Before you go shopping you must evaluate these needs. This will help you narrow down to more relevant choices. 2. Set a budget Like every other buy, it is important to have a set budget when it comes to purchasing a laptop. This will help prevent “buyer dissonance” that people sometimes experience. Buyer dissonance is a feeling of regret or feeling cheated especially if you paid a premium price for a product. A budget will give you a peace of mind because you will only spend what you have planned and can afford. Laptops range from less than $ 500 to over $1500. Having a budget will also help you narrow down on your search. 3. Determine your operating system of choice The operating system determines some things as:a) The user interfaceb) The type of programs you can runc) Compatibility with other devicesd) The security of your system The 3 common operating systems are Windows, Linux, and OSX for Mac. These OS are different and each has its advantages and drawbacks. It is, therefore, important to do your research and know what will work best for you. 3. Specs are everything This is probably what matters most in a laptop. Specs determine how fast or slow your computer is and what tasks it can do and what it can’t do. Usually, you will find that the higher the price, the better the specs you will get. However, this is not always the fact hence you should carefully determine what you are buying. Some of the most important specs to consider include the speed of the processor, the RAM, and the storage space. a) The speed of the processor. The speed of the processor is determined by how powerful it is. The more powerful a processor the faster the speed of your computer will be. Some systems will combine several processors to provide even better performance. Common processors include Intel and AMD. With Intel you will find that core i3, i5, i7 are way faster than Atom, Pentium or Celeron. With AMD you will prefer A6 or A8 over the C or E series. b) The RAM This is an acronym for random access memory. It is the memory that is required to launch and run a computer program. The more RAM your machine has, the smoother it will run and the more its ability to multitask. However, RAM can be upgraded. c) The storage space The disk space determines how much data you can store on your laptop. The main options here are the hard drive and solid state drives (SSD). SSDs offer better performance and are lighter than hard disks. However, they are more expensive. If you store a lot of files e.g. videos or photos, buy something with a large storage. If you are a casual user, 500 GB should be sufficient. 4. Check the connectivity options with other devices Buy something with as many options here as possible. USB ports are standard and you should have at least two. HDMI port allows connection with a big screen TV. VGA port allows connection with projectors or another monitor while Bluetooth allows connectivity with other Bluetooth-enabled devices including smart phones, printers etc 5. Internet connectivityIn this age, you must be able to access the internet with your laptop. Choose something that has built in WIFI connectivity and if possible, a 4G LTE enabled machine is even better.
Newsworthy
Here’s an article about the coming age of computers and artificial intelligence.

A COMPUTER TO RIVAL THE BRAIN

Artificial intelligence has achieved much of its recent success by mimicking biology. Now it must go further. Artificial intelligence has achieved much of its recent success by mimicking biology. Now it must go further. More than two hundred years ago, a French weaver named Joseph Jacquard invented a mechanism that greatly simplified textile production. His design replaced the lowly draw boy—the young apprentice who meticulously chose which threads to feed into the loom to create a particular pattern—with a series of paper punch cards, which had holes dictating the lay of each stitch. The device was so successful that it was repurposed in the first interfaces between humans and computers; for much of the twentieth century, programmers laid out their code like weavers, using a lattice of punched holes. The cards themselves were fussy and fragile. Ethereal information was at the mercy of its paper substrate, coded in a language only experts could understand. But successive computer interfaces became more natural, more flexible. Immutable program instructions were softened to “If x, then y. When a, try b.” Now, long after Jacquard’s invention, we simply ask Amazon’s Echo to start a pot of coffee, or Apple’s Siri to find the closest car wash. In order to make our interactions with machines more natural, we’ve learned to model them after ourselves. Read more here. It’s amazing to think, that a computer can now think like a human.
Copyright 2009, Neils Blog LLC
Welcome To Neil’s Blog